2016 Grant Abstracts

Here are the projects we will be funding this year.

‘Umm at Tawabin’: A Nabataean/Roman Military Camp, Ghor as-Safi, Jordan

Alexandra Ariotti

Umm at Tawabin is an extensive Nabataean/Roman military site in southern Jordan. The site consists of some fortified buildings, circular stone structures, a roadway and other features enclosed by a massive wall and with a predominance of Nabataean and Roman surface pottery on the ground. Up until now, Umm at Tawabin has only been documented in brief in a handful of survey reports since its discovery in the late 19th century and its chronology has remained the subject of some conjecture among scholars. With funding from the PEF in 2014, I surveyed the site and studied its surface pottery and architectural remains in detail, the results of which are to be published (forthcoming) in the PEQ. However, in order to better understand the occupational history of this undoubted historically important and unique site, and as an extension of my work at Umm at Tawabin, I propose to undertake a 30 day excavation to be co-sponsored by the PEF. I plan to publish my findings in the PEQ, and eventually as a PEQ Monograph.

An Investigation of Fāţimid Metalwork from Ṭabariyya and Ḳayṣāriyya: Two Archaeological Findspots from Medieval Bilād al-Shām

Gregory Bilotto

My proposed research through the Palestine Exploration Fund will be undertaken at the Israel Museum in Jerusalem, which holds cultural material from two Fāţimid period cities. The two cities, Ṭabariyya and Ḳayṣāriyya, are now ruined however recent excavations at both cities have yielded two metalwork hoards likely buried during the turmoil of the 11th century CE. These twin discoveries have provided a solid context for the identification and provenance of metal objects datable to the Fāţimid period and the information provided is therefore considerable.

The proposed research will support my overall PhD studies at the University of London’s School of Oriental and African Studies in the area of medieval Islamic archaeology. My area of specialization covers Fāţimid produced metalwork, including its dissemination through the regions of the Mediterranean and Red Seas. This research on Fāţimid period metal objects has often been overlooked in the scholarly record. The research is necessary however toward advancing our understanding of the objects’ circulation in the regions with a Fāţimid interaction.

Karimeh Abbud: Lady Photographer of Palestine

Mary Pelletier

In the male-dominated landscape of early Holy Land photography, Karimeh Abbud stands out as one of the first female Palestinian photographers of the 20th century. My research will investigate Abbud’s photographic archive, the majority of which is held intact by the Nazareth Archive Project, with the goal of measuring her contribution to the larger scope of early Palestinian photography. Abbud worked in five major Palestinian cities in the 1920s, ‘30s and ‘40s (Bethlehem, Tiberias, Haifa, Nazareth and Caesarea) and set up a commercial studio during that time. I aim to examine two aspects of Abbud’s photographic practice: her access to women and families who felt comfortable in the presence of a female photographer and its resulting, perhaps specialised, imagery, as well as her professional interactions with male photographers during the British Mandate period.

The Islamic Bayda Project

Micaela Sinibaldi

The Islamic Bayda Project focuses on archaeological investigations of an Islamic-period village in the area of Bayda, Petra region. Former archaeological work has established that the site has been in use from at least the Nabataean to the Ottoman periods, and that the most recent phase of the village is very extensive. This continutiy of occupation originates from the fortunate geological and climatic conditions which have always made this area one of the most favoured of the Petra region for agricultural activities.

The site includes village habitations organised in several clusters, a church, and two mosques.

Some of the principal aims of the Islamic Bayda Project is to investigate the range and development through time of the forms and dynamics of settlement in the Petra region during the whole Islamic period and to explore the important relationship between the Petra valley, where settlement continued without major gaps, and its hinterland.

Yusuf Kanaan: local agency and its limitations in nineteenth-century Palestinian archaeology

Sarah Irving

The history of Western archaeologists working in Palestine has been widely studied. But the voices of the Arab Palestinians who worked alongside them have largely remained unheard, with the exception of research into the ethnological work of Tawfiq Canaan and his colleagues. The archives of the PEF hold notebooks from the late 19th century by Yusuf Kanaan, an archaeological site manager and perhaps specialist dragoman who helped PEF archaeologists on several excavations and whose name appears in PEF publications. Drawing on existing research into Palestinian and other Middle Eastern antiquities, as well as my current research into the lives and works of Stephan Stephan, Elias Haddad and Tawfiq Canaan, this paper pushes back the history of Arab Palestinian engagement in the archaeology and ethnography of Palestine back to the nineteenth century, revealing local agency in the exploration of Palestine’s history whilst also exposing its limitations in the colonial setting.

In the Footsteps of Bliss and Dickie on Mount Zion

Yehiel Zellinger

The earliest excavations on the slopes of Mount Zion were carried out between the years 1894-1897 by Frederick J. Bliss and Archibald C. Dickie, on behalf of the London-based Palestine Exploration Fund. Their methodology involved the excavation of a series of shafts that interconnected via tunnels located along the outer face of the defence walls surrounding Mt. Zion. The detailed and comprehensive publication of their excavations (Bliss and Dickie 1898) is a milestone in the history of archaeological research in Jerusalem since it contains illustrations, detailed plans and clear sections of two fortification systems.

Since 2007 we have re- excavated a large part of the city walls first exposed in Bliss and Dickie’s tunnels. The aim of the proposed research is to examine their original letters, maps and reports, which are housed in the PEF archives, and to bring to light any details which were not published in the original book, thereby providing important insights to our current fieldwork on Mount Zion.

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