The Islamic Bayda Project

By Micaela Sinibaldi

The Islamic Bayda Project, affiliated with Cardiff University, was launched in 2014. It is co-funded by the Barakat Trust and the Palestine Exploration Fund.

During this first season of excavations, we excavated some habitations of this Islamic-period agricultural village to collect evidence about daily life at the site.

The Islamic Bayda Project team, 2014

The Islamic Bayda Project team, 2014. From left to right: Mohammed Abdullah Ammarin; Siham Nawafle (Department of Antiquities of Jordan, Representative); Ahmad Ibrahim Ammarin; Heather Crowley (Cardiff University, PhD student); Micaela Sinibaldi (Cardiff University, project director); Ghassem Jibril Ammarin. Standing in the trench: Mohammed Eid Ammarin. Photo: Qais Tweissi.

Cleaning a surface of occupation in the habitation courtyard.

Cleaning a surface of occupation in the habitation courtyard. In this area, we found a tabun (bread oven), and another one was found in the other sector of the trench. Photo: Qais Tweissi.

The visit by the staff of the American Center of Oriental Research: Barbara Porter (ACOR Director) and Glenn Corbett (ACOR associate director) with Micaela Sinibaldi, project director.

The visit by the staff of the American Center of Oriental Research: Barbara Porter (ACOR Director) and Glenn Corbett (ACOR associate director) with Micaela Sinibaldi, project director. Photo: Heather Crowley.

Tea break.

Twice a day we have a break to enjoy (very) sweet, energizing Bedouin tea, which is prepared every time by a different team member. Photo: Qais Tweissi.

Team members relaxing after a long final day in the field, and all dressed up for the final dinner of the Islamic Bayda Project. For this occasion, we organized a barbecue in Bayda, where we grilled chicken and vegetables.

Team members relaxing after a long final day in the field, and all dressed up for the final dinner of the Islamic Bayda Project. For this occasion, we organized a barbecue in Bayda, where we grilled chicken and vegetables. Photo: Micaela Sinibaldi.

The project has also launched a new initiative, the Schools Day.  Organised in collaboration with the Petra Archaeological Park, this year the project invited girls from schools in Bayda, Umm Sayun and Wadi Mousa (Petra region) to join us at the site with their teachers. The main aim of this activity was to involve the local communities in our archaeological work at Bayda. On this occasion, the students were introduced to the main features of the site and the meaning of the archaeologist’s job. The damaging effects of looting on the archaeological record were also discussed.

The schools day at the Islamic Bayda Project: visit to the church.

The Schools Day at the Islamic Bayda Project: visit to the church, which was created by reusing a Nabataean-period structure. Photo: Qais Tweissi.

The schools day at the Islamic Bayda Project: visit to the mosque.

The Schools Day at the Islamic Bayda Project: visit to the remains of the mosque and discussion about the effects of looting on the archaeological site. Photo: Qais Tweissi.

The schools day at the Islamic Bayda Project: visit to the trench.

The Schools Day at the Islamic Bayda Project: visit to the trench and questions and answer session on the job of the archaeologist. Photo: Heather Crowley.

 

One thought on “The Islamic Bayda Project

  1. E’ magnifico . Bellissime anche le foto. Wadi Mousa mi ricordo bene. Beyda è prima rispetto al sito di Petra?Brava brava brava!

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