2017 Grant Abstracts

Umm at Tawabin: A Nabataean/Roman Military Camp, Ghor as-Safi

Alexandra Ariotti

Umm at-Tawabin is an extensive fortified Nabataean/Roman site overlooking Wadi al-‘Arabah in south Jordan. The site consists of four buildings, over one hundred circular stone structures and other related features that are fortified by a 2.5 km long wall. In 2015-2016 with a PEF grant, I sought to address the question of the site’s chronology through survey and a study of its surface pottery, the results of which are to be published in a forthcoming research article in the PEQ (2017). As my initial investigation concluded, selective excavation of these numerous architectural components was necessary to order to obtain a complete stratigraphic sequence of the site. In February 2017, excavations co-sponsored by the PEF have so far produced securely-dateable cultural material thus confirming that its main fortification, Fort A, was a Nabataean/Roman defence post designed for defence and monitoring. Pending analysis of the pottery recovered from two of the stone circles and the main perimeter wall will further augment our understanding of the site’s occupational history. I now propose to carry out a second 30 day excavation in February, 2018 to retrieve material from three of its remaining forts (Forts B-D) and along the east perimeter wall, and to summarise my findings from this preliminary 2017 season.

A study of Fatimid metal objects in the Keir Collection at the Dallas Museum of Art

Gregory Bilotto

My PhD research concerns metalwork produced under the Fāţimids (909-1172 CE). A component of my research involves the study of Fāţimid metal objects recovered from archaeological excavations and definitely identified as Fāţimid through scientific evidence. A previous travel grant was awarded in 2016 by the Palestine Exploration Fund to examine metal objects datable to the Fāţimids and excavated from two ruined cities in mediaeval Bilad al-Sham. Building upon the research completed in 2016, which includes metalwork designs, imagery and production techniques, a continuation study of Fāţimid metalwork without an archaeological provenance will be undertaken in the Keir Collection at the Dallas Museum of Art in Dallas, Texas. The purpose is to apply the data collected from identified Fāţimid metal objects with those of an unknown origin. The result would be a more accurate identification for all the known Fāţimid metalwork without an archaeological provenance.

Religion, Modernity & the Material Reception of the Holy Land

Crispin Paine

The project’s aim is to examine the reception of the ‘Holy Land’ in modern America, in parks and public venues themed on the Bible – themed notably on Jerusalem, the Israelite Temple, life in ancient Palestine and Noah’s Ark. This project is part of a wider study of religion in theme-parks worldwide, which builds on my work on religion and museums. Religion impacts on modernity in a variety of ways, many of them material. As a burgeoning middle class seeks out modernity and fun as well as education and divine help, theme-parks are taking over much of the role of museums and much of the role of temples.

Diban: Food Production and Consumption in times of Rapid Change

Bruce Routledge

Changes in food production and consumption are sensitive indicators of social and economic change.  At Tell Dhiban, Jordan we have the opportunity to explore changes in diet during two moments of significant historical change and to compare that trajectory of change in a common environment under distinct historical circumstances.  In Field W we have identified domestic waste deposits from teh early eighth century BCE, correlating with a period of massive settlement growth as Dhiban became the capital of the Iron Age kingdom of Moab.  In Field 5 we have isolated a sequence bridging the earliest moments of the transition from Late Byzantine to Early Islamic rule.  In both cases, preliminary evidence suggests changes in both how food is produced and what food is consumed over brief periods of time. In 2017 we will collect further botanical and faunal remains in order to clarify, interpret and compare these patterns of change.

The Islamic Bayda Project

Micaela Sinibaldi

The Islamic Bayda Project focuses on archaeological investigations of an Islamic-period village in the area of Bayda, Petra region. The site, which includes village habitations organised in several clusters, a church, and two mosques, has been in use from at least the Nabataean to the Ottoman periods. This continuity of occupation originates from the fortunate geological and climatic conditions which have always made this area one of the most favoured of the Petra region for agricultural activities.  Some of the principal aims of the Islamic Bayda Project are to investigate the range and development through time of the forms and dynamics of settlement in the Petra region during the whole Islamic period and to explore the important relationship between the Petra valley, where settlement continued without major gaps, and its hinterland.  After three campaigns of excavation, it is proposed that the conservation of one of the two mosques is now started.

Differences in Traditional Health Seeking Practices between Rural and Urban Negev Bedouin Populations

Monika Wanis

Despite the establishment of Israel’s National Health Insurance Law which provided universal biomedical healthcare to all citizens, there remains a large number of rural Bedouins living in Israel’s Negev region with inadequate access to healthcare. This research project will determine how the enactment of this law has shaped Bedouin people’s patterns of utilization, awareness and preferences associated with biomedical and traditional health. A cross-sectional, mixed methods design consisting of interviews, participant observation and case studies will be conducted in the Negev region in Israel for six weeks beginning July 1, 2017. Research findings will educate policymakers on the ramifications of this law and encourage health policy modifications to enhance Bedouin health.